Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

7 books for a new kind of library school. – By their very nature formal education programmes are playing catch up with the latest research and trends.  Sally suggests that instead of learning about “the job” library school should teach about learning, leading, and problem solving.  A great suggestion with some recommended reading for this new curriculum. (Shared by School of Information Studies at CSU’s facebook page.)

Yes, you can still teach kids to love books. – I often despair of how we put young people off reading by they way we teach English and literacy in schools.  Sometimes I need to feel a little bit of hope.  This article did that.  I need to share it with our English department. (Shared by NPR on Tumblr.)

Why do our best ideas come to us in the shower.  – In the weekend Alison, Michelle, and I had a conversation on Twitter about the best blog posts we never wrote and where we were when inspiration struck.  Michelle then shared the science behind these inspirational moments.  I love random Twitter conversations! (Shared by Michelle on Twitter.)

 

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

OER and you. The curation mandate. – Open Education Resources are coming and school libraries (librarians) need to be in the game.  They should be helping to curate resources, making resources discoverable, and working with teachers to use resources ethically and legally.  A call to be ready when the platforms and your teachers are ready! (Shared by Carole on the schoollib listserv.)

The ancient productivity tool that will boost your brain power. – How paper and pen can make you more creative and productive.  Technology is good but sometimes old school can be better. (Shared by Buffy Hamilton on Twitter.)

How this school library increased student use by 1000 percent.  – Love this idea of moving beyond makerspaces, of having library use connected to classroom learning, and of this change being led by the school principal.  There is much that will be referred to here for March’s #EdBlogNZ challenge. (Shared by Desna on SLANZA’s facebook page.)

Thanks to Stephanie at Teaching the Teacher for this idea and format.

Website: Christchurch City Libraries

Christchurch City Libraries

Christchurch City Libraries. (n.d.). Home. Retrieved November 14, 2014, from http://christchurch.bibliocms.com/

Category: interesting and useful

Overview: I have followed the amazing Christchurch Kids Blog for a while now, but have recently discovered that they are moving to a new platform in December.  That new platform is the all new Christchurch City Libraries website hosted on BiblioCommons.  The new site is currently available for preview.  It looks amazing and there is a whole lot of information on it to explore.  I look forward to going back and spending some time looking at how this public library has its online presence nailed.

Website: School Library Journal

School Library Journal

School Library Journal. (2014). Home. Retrieved November 14, 2014, from http://www.slj.com/

Category: interesting and useful

Overview: The School Library Journal is a professional journal for school and CYA librarians.  The print subscription cost is quite expensive for overseas subscribers, however, we are lucky to have access for free through the Open Polytechnic or Ministry of Education databases.  The online version of the journal is not displayed like a magazine but there is access to a ton of information, including the blog of school library maestro Joyce Valenza and a few well known review blogs.  There is a lot to explore on this website.

Website: Literacy Online

Literacy Online

TKI has developed an amazing one-stop-shop with its Literacy Online webpages.

It is somewhat ironic that I have discovered this useful resource as a librarian, that I did not have the time to discover as a teacher.

And isn’t the tagline great?  I beat Mem Fox would approve!


Ministry of Education. (n.d.). Literacy Online. Retrieved November 10, 2014, from http://literacyonline.tki.org.nz/

Category: interesting and useful

Overview: Literacy Online is a website designed to help develop teaching and learning programmes to meet the literacy needs of primary and secondary students.  As well as providing access to MoE documents and lesson plans, it also has links to professional readings and relevant research.