Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

For the last time, Google is not our competition in libraries… I really enjoyed this smart, pithy piece. Of course Google is awesome at some stuff – and why would we try to compete with it? After all, I bet you use it all the time in your librarian life. But Google is not so good at other stuff, deeper stuff, the people-based stuff, so let’s show off our skills in that! (Shared by Carole Gardiner of Twitter.)

Words matter: Why I’m not ready to drop “digital” from the #DigCit conversation. Some interesting thoughts and provocative questions about digital citizenship and how it differs from citizenship. I like the idea of programmes focusing on the positive, as a lot of digital citizenship lessons seems to focus on plagiarism and cyberbullying aspects (and don’t get me wrong, these are aspects of #DigCit – they just shouldn’t be the whole focus).

Google to highlight fact-checking articles with new labels. This is a promising sign in our “post-truth” world. However, it would be great if some of the social media giants would look at doing something similar, with 44% of Americans getting their news from Facebook. Education surely plays a part as well, but it is a slow way to effect change. (Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

Pre-university skills course boost students’ A-level success. This was shared on the NZ schoollib listserv as a kind of self-congratulation to those librarians involved in tertiary transition library programmes. And that’s okay. But I read it as a single cohort study, with anecdotal reporting, self-selected participants (who are more likely to apply themselves and do well), and no significant discussion of the data and what it means. It’s great if these types of programmes are having an effect on wider student learning and achievement. But let’s not all hang it on one study. We’re better than that, we’re information professionals.

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Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos,shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

We Are Terrible At Data Literacy. And this is now having a terrifying impact on world politics! Once again, education is touted as being the answer to this problem. But this is a slow way to deal with something that is happening now. I don’t know what a more direct solution is (but surely journalism should hold some accountability too) so I’m going to hide my head in the sand. (Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

New report on family engagement in public libraries. A project that investigated the ways in which public libraries engage with libraries. Some interesting implications for school libraries and the ways in which we engage with our communities. (Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

Reading in 2016 – digital vs print, the ultimate smackdown! Yes! To all this, yes! Please let’s not have the either / or debate anymore. It should always be “and”; as Kay rightly says, with purpose, pedagogy and learning objectives driving choices. Thanks, Kay, for articulating so well what many of us in Libraryland think! (Shared by Helen Stower on Twitter.)

Research: Yes, Being Helpful Is Tiring. Possibly explains why I finished Term 3 so exhausted! I like that it has tips for those that ask for help, as well as those who are helpers. Now, I’m off for a restorative nap. (Shared by Tim Kong on Twitter.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

Screw digital natives: Behaviour not age, is what matters. As an educator, I hate the term “digital natives” and this post pretty much sums up why. Lots of our students think they are really awesome online, but actually their skills are pretty limited or limiting. And maybe so are some of the tasks we set. (Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

Millenials as digital natives: Myths and realities. Another interesting read on the “digital native” myth that appeared on my timeline. I particularly love the last two paragraphs in the section titled “How Being a Digital Native Does Influence Behavior” – which is certainly the behaviour that I observe at school! (Shared by Trish Webster, I can’t remember where!)

Literary fiction helps us ‘read’ others. Just in case you know someone who needs convincing that reading is good for us. Or who perhaps needs encouragement to read a “literary” novel in between all the crime fiction. It’s not being a book snob, it’s encouraging being a better human! (Shared by Rachel van Riel on Twitter.)

5 tips for helping a student find the right book. Some good reminders here about how we can help our students find “the” book. Time to find a book is one of my favourite strategies – and something I need to remind our busy teachers about! (Shared by Rebeca Zuniga on Twitter.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

How I made my advertisement in keynote. Some good tricks in here for how to use presentation software to make more than simple slideshows. This post focuses on Apple’s Keynote, but you can probably find similar tools in the software that you use. Oh to have time to play! (Shared by Richard Wells on his blog.)

Always click the first Google result? You might want to stop doing that. As Alison Hewett pointed out when she shared this on Twitter, this is nothing new to librarians! However, this could be the thing to share in case your students or teachers need convincing about moving deeper into their search results and that the filter bubble is really a thing! (Shared by Alison Hewett on Twitter.)

What business are libraries in? I don’t have an elevator pitch. I know I need one, but I find it almost impossible to explain what I do and why it’s important. I agree that it is important to separate out the personnel from the building – but what are my eight words? (Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

4 reasons gifted programs are irrelevant. I have quite a few problems with “gifted” programmes. One of the main ones is that generally “gifted” is used to mean smart. Certainly at the school I work at their is no programme for students who are gifted in areas such as the arts or physical education. Another big problem I have with it is that (again, generally speaking) it’s not about the students – it’s about the parents or for school marketing purposes. Why shouldn’t all students be given the care and attention that the “gifted” receive? (Shared by Mark Barnes on Twitter.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

The WHY of libraries and librarians. I haven’t watched the video yet – but I will come back to it and also the exercise at the end. Because I am all about the WHY. Why do we do stuff? Why should we continue to be employed? We need to have a clear idea and it should be written down in our strategic plan and / or library policies. If we can’t say why we do what we do why should we expect anyone else to know? (Shared by Lis Marrow on Twitter.)

How technology disrupted the truth. I despair of the mainstream media at times – and this did not make me feel any better! Provides some good examples of the filter bubble and a reminder about not sharing links you haven’t investigated. It is also a good reminder about why we should be teaching our students how to be critical thinkers. I hope society gets over its anti-expert thing soon. And I long for politicians to become post-post-truth! (Shared by John  Campbell on Twitter.)

 

The best starter graphic novels for YA readers. This could be a good place to start for those who aren’t sure. I’ve got some of these titles already, others are probably not of huge interest for my demographic (teenage boys), but I’ll definitely be looking out for The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil! There’s some good suggestions in the comments too. (Shared by Libraries & Learning on Twitter.)

Book-loving stars on Instagram: They’re the new Oprah. I love that celebrities are sharing what they’re reading on social media and giving authors and their books greater exposure. But can we please try and keep this organic? Let the celebs pick and choose what they’re going to read and share. Pretty please. And if these women could persuade some of their male co-stars to do something similar that would be excellent. Some fierce male reading role models would be awesome right now. (Shared by Kathryn Schravemade on Twitter.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

What I learned about library marketing from an amusement park. While not all of this blog is relevant to my school library, it is certainly a reminder about putting user experience at the centre of things and about how we can learn from other unrelated organisations. (Shared by Jane Cowell on Twitter.)

How great school libraries can inspire. A blog post about a boys’ school library’s refurbishment. I so wanted more photos. (Shared by Stefanie Gaspari on Twitter.)

Pokemon Go brings augmented reality to the mainstream. Lots of #ThinkyThoughts after reading this about ways to make the Year 9 library orientation more interesting. Maybe I could offer to help one of the social sciences teachers make their “Our School” unit more interactive too… (Shared by Kay Oddone on Twitter.)

8 digital skills we must teach our children. A useful overview of the skills we should be teaching people to be good digital citizens. Definitely something to be referred to when creating any school policies or programmes. (Shared by Digital Citizenship in Schools on Facebook.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

What is ‘digital wellbeing’?  Definitely something I’m interested in at the moment.  As we demand our students use technology to aid in their learning, are we doing everything we can to teach them about looking after themselves as well.  I will have a look at this more in-depth in the ‘Tech-free Tuesday’ post I am still working on.  (Shared by Sally on Twitter.)

A belated confession.  An extremely honest post about how we can’t be awesome at all of the things all of the time.  So much of this resonated with me.  And it is so good to hear stuff like this from our heroes.  Look after your health and well-being, people – be awesome at some of the things some of the time – and don’t beat yourself up about it!  (Shared by the Mighty Little Librarian on Twitter.)

Is social media making promoting ignorance in educators?  A good reminder about how to make social media platforms work for you and to think before you share other people’s content.  There is a lot of good stuff here about information literacy and I think social media would be a much better place if all people heeded this advice, not just educators!  (Shared by Train the Teacher on WordPress.)