Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

For the last time, Google is not our competition in libraries… I really enjoyed this smart, pithy piece. Of course Google is awesome at some stuff – and why would we try to compete with it? After all, I bet you use it all the time in your librarian life. But Google is not so good at other stuff, deeper stuff, the people-based stuff, so let’s show off our skills in that! (Shared by Carole Gardiner of Twitter.)

Words matter: Why I’m not ready to drop “digital” from the #DigCit conversation. Some interesting thoughts and provocative questions about digital citizenship and how it differs from citizenship. I like the idea of programmes focusing on the positive, as a lot of digital citizenship lessons seems to focus on plagiarism and cyberbullying aspects (and don’t get me wrong, these are aspects of #DigCit – they just shouldn’t be the whole focus).

Google to highlight fact-checking articles with new labels. This is a promising sign in our “post-truth” world. However, it would be great if some of the social media giants would look at doing something similar, with 44% of Americans getting their news from Facebook. Education surely plays a part as well, but it is a slow way to effect change. (Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

Pre-university skills course boost students’ A-level success. This was shared on the NZ schoollib listserv as a kind of self-congratulation to those librarians involved in tertiary transition library programmes. And that’s okay. But I read it as a single cohort study, with anecdotal reporting, self-selected participants (who are more likely to apply themselves and do well), and no significant discussion of the data and what it means. It’s great if these types of programmes are having an effect on wider student learning and achievement. But let’s not all hang it on one study. We’re better than that, we’re information professionals.

Advertisements

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

Online life is real life, aleph-nought in a series. A good reminder that this whole online vs real life is an artificial construct. There is just life. Some of it you will spend online. Some of it you will not. And goes towards the point I tried to make at an ICT steering committee meeting – we need to teach our guys about being “good men” in all contexts, and not just inside the school gates. (Shared by John Scalzi on Twitter.)

Why are we still ignoring @SirKenRobinson? Because New Zealand government policy demands us too? Or because our educational leaders are not brave enough to run their schools in ways that meet policy demand but are not driven by them? Either way, it’s pretty much why I left classroom teaching. (Shared by Richard Wells on Twitter.)

No benefit to single-sex education, Australian Psychological Congress to be told. Aargh! As a feminist, I have such angst at working at a boys’ school. This did not help! But I found it a really interesting read as this is the main thrust of the marketing our school runs. Should I put the cat among the pigeons and share it with our SMT? (Shared by Stuart Kelly on Twitter.)

Genre readers have less empathy? I’m not feeling that. A few weeks ago I shared a post about how literary fiction makes us better humans, so it seemed only fair to share Val McDermid’s response. And what a response! Pithy, funny, and throws some shade. Read what you like, people! (Shared by Rachel van Riel on Twitter.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

You are not a digital native: Privacy in the age of the internet.  A really interesting post about how companies are getting away with invading privacy by saying “but the kids are digital natives so they know what they’re signing up for”. I love Doctorow’s definition of privacy, ‘[it] doesn’t mean that no one in the world knows about your business. It means that you get to choose who knows about your business.’ (Shared by Cory Doctorow on Tumblr.)

How to be mediocre and be happy with yourself. In praise of being average! Who knew that this was even a field of study?! The message here is learn to embrace your mediocrity. I’m entirely comfortable with mine! (Shared by a teacher, FF, at school and leading to another post by Mark Manson.)

4 creative PowerPoint uses you probably haven’t tried. Don’t hate on PowerPoint – use it more effectively! (Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

Using PowerPoint as a design tool. And this post from Ned Potter shares some more PowerPoint goodness. Am now feeling the need to redo every slideshow I’ve ever made…(Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

Why ‘medalling’ and ‘summering’ are so annoying. An interesting and entertaining look at the “verbing of nouns” in the English language. Made me snort and nod my head. But not simultaneously, that would just be weird. (Shared by an English teacher, FF, at school.)

Privacy – important even if you have nothing to hide. A great post on digital citizenship, discussing how we might not have that much privacy even if we think we are doing all the right things. Lots of interesting links are shared. Will definitely be spending more time with this post. (Shared by Carole Gardiner on Twitter.)

The privacy problem. Speaking of privacy…an interesting discussion was had on the NZ schoollib listserv recently about our duty to protect student privacy. Many of us break this privacy (without even thinking about it) when we deal with overdue books and borrowing statistics. A good reminder to have some policies in place dealing with this issue! (Shared by Karen Clarke on the schoollib listserv.)

On white fragility.  If you’re not aware of the whole #WeNeedDiverseBooks thing you should probably get out more. This is an excellent post on why white people hate talking about race and a thoughtful reflection on why this author has decided she will no longer write books with a PoC main character. If you only ever click on one link that I share, make it this one. (Shared by Justine Larbalestier on Twitter.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

I can’t even with librarians that don’t read diversely. This. So much this. This to all those school librarians who say they don’t need to buy Pasifika books because there are no Pasifika students in their schools. This to all those school librarians who don’t even read. I. Just. Can’t. (Shared by Book Riot on Twitter.)

John  Dewey hate your digital citizenship curriculum. I’m part of my school’s ICT steering committee and we have been talking about how we don’t teach our students anything about digital citizenship. I think this post is full of important messages and questions we should be asking ourselves before we develop any sort of programme. I’m a big believer in just teaching our guys to be good citizens no matter what space they are in. But I love this idea of COMMUNITY as well. I’ll be sharing this with the rest of the committee. (Shared by Sally Pewhairangi on Twitter.)

Daniel Pennac, The Rights of the Reader. I love the way Austin Kleon writes about the books he’s read. I was a late discoverer of this book. And I’ll admit to having bought a copy that I haven’t yet read. This post has moved the book up to the top of my TBR pile. And I have no doubt that I will refer to it often as I think about devising a long-term literacy strategy for my school. (Shared by Austin Kleon on Tumblr.)

Libraries matter: 18 fantastic library infographics. Some great facts and figures here to help advocate for libraries. And while it’s heavily American-based, there’s also some really good dos and don’ts of design to be seen in the various infographs.  (Shared by Bridget Schaumann.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

The WHY of libraries and librarians. I haven’t watched the video yet – but I will come back to it and also the exercise at the end. Because I am all about the WHY. Why do we do stuff? Why should we continue to be employed? We need to have a clear idea and it should be written down in our strategic plan and / or library policies. If we can’t say why we do what we do why should we expect anyone else to know? (Shared by Lis Marrow on Twitter.)

How technology disrupted the truth. I despair of the mainstream media at times – and this did not make me feel any better! Provides some good examples of the filter bubble and a reminder about not sharing links you haven’t investigated. It is also a good reminder about why we should be teaching our students how to be critical thinkers. I hope society gets over its anti-expert thing soon. And I long for politicians to become post-post-truth! (Shared by John  Campbell on Twitter.)

 

The best starter graphic novels for YA readers. This could be a good place to start for those who aren’t sure. I’ve got some of these titles already, others are probably not of huge interest for my demographic (teenage boys), but I’ll definitely be looking out for The Gigantic Beard That Was Evil! There’s some good suggestions in the comments too. (Shared by Libraries & Learning on Twitter.)

Book-loving stars on Instagram: They’re the new Oprah. I love that celebrities are sharing what they’re reading on social media and giving authors and their books greater exposure. But can we please try and keep this organic? Let the celebs pick and choose what they’re going to read and share. Pretty please. And if these women could persuade some of their male co-stars to do something similar that would be excellent. Some fierce male reading role models would be awesome right now. (Shared by Kathryn Schravemade on Twitter.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

What I learned about library marketing from an amusement park. While not all of this blog is relevant to my school library, it is certainly a reminder about putting user experience at the centre of things and about how we can learn from other unrelated organisations. (Shared by Jane Cowell on Twitter.)

How great school libraries can inspire. A blog post about a boys’ school library’s refurbishment. I so wanted more photos. (Shared by Stefanie Gaspari on Twitter.)

Pokemon Go brings augmented reality to the mainstream. Lots of #ThinkyThoughts after reading this about ways to make the Year 9 library orientation more interesting. Maybe I could offer to help one of the social sciences teachers make their “Our School” unit more interactive too… (Shared by Kay Oddone on Twitter.)

8 digital skills we must teach our children. A useful overview of the skills we should be teaching people to be good digital citizens. Definitely something to be referred to when creating any school policies or programmes. (Shared by Digital Citizenship in Schools on Facebook.)

Interesting reading this week:

Kardos_Interesting_Reading_1891

Interesting Reading by Gyula Kardos, shared on Wikimedia Commons as a public domain work of art

What is ‘digital wellbeing’?  Definitely something I’m interested in at the moment.  As we demand our students use technology to aid in their learning, are we doing everything we can to teach them about looking after themselves as well.  I will have a look at this more in-depth in the ‘Tech-free Tuesday’ post I am still working on.  (Shared by Sally on Twitter.)

A belated confession.  An extremely honest post about how we can’t be awesome at all of the things all of the time.  So much of this resonated with me.  And it is so good to hear stuff like this from our heroes.  Look after your health and well-being, people – be awesome at some of the things some of the time – and don’t beat yourself up about it!  (Shared by the Mighty Little Librarian on Twitter.)

Is social media making promoting ignorance in educators?  A good reminder about how to make social media platforms work for you and to think before you share other people’s content.  There is a lot of good stuff here about information literacy and I think social media would be a much better place if all people heeded this advice, not just educators!  (Shared by Train the Teacher on WordPress.)